Centre for Central Banking Studies

The Bank of England’s CCBS runs an extensive programme of events for central bankers and financial regulators from around the world.

Introduction to CCBS

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  • My name is John Power and I am the Director of the Bank’s Centre for Central Banking Studies. I am joined by Huw Pill, our recently appointed Chief Economist and today we are launching our international seminar programme for 2022. We’ll use the opportunity to reflect on this past (rather weird) year and set out our thinking for the future. We hope that by the end of our short message you will be sufficiently enthused to check out the rest of our website and sign up for our seminars.

    Getting into the detail, I have three messages for you.

    First, we continue to be open for business to central bankers and regulators from all over the world. As you know like everyone we have had to adapt our working model over the past 18 months. Here in CCBS our entire programme has moved to virtual. In our view that has proven transformational. For example, in September over 300 delegates registered for our event on climate scenario analysis and stress testing. Colleagues came from all four corners of the planet, with the countries present representing 80% of global carbon emissions. That was simply not possible in the old world. What’s more we’ve been able to make the material available to colleagues afterwards – allowing for further review and analysis.

    Now virtual delivery is not be all and end all – it’s harder to have a fireside discussion with colleagues – to build those all so important personal connections, or provide a lot of tailored individual support. We completely recognise this and we should offer some physical activities in the future. But we do think that virtual should become an important part of our operating model even after the pandemic subsides. It makes good sense from an inclusion perspective. And frankly climate change considerations demand it.

    For next year, I don’t have a particularly strong crystal ball with respect to the pandemic. So our conservative planning assumptions continue to be virtual, flipping to physical if circumstances allow and where it makes sense to do so for any particular event. Further out when we reach a new steady state we’re planning that that at least 50% of our programme will remain virtual.

    My second point is about our mission and purpose, and here, I want to reassure you that, despite the operational changes, our mission remains unchanged – in fact it’s as relevant now as it ever was: we want to equip central bankers and financial regulators with the expert skills needed to deal with the challenges our community faces. And unashamedly we do this to promote global, economic and financial stability as well as UK development objectives.

    So, in our programme you’ll continue to see a very broad offering across cutting-edge analytics; seminars on the current priorities and the hot topics that are high on our shared agenda, as well as more academically oriented research conferences at the frontier of our thinking. In the detail we’re thinking hard about things like how we analyse data using free-to-use software applications such as R; developments in central banks’ balances sheets in the new normal; the risks from the non‐bank financial sector – how we assess and manage them; the use of fintech in the world of payments supervision and regulation, new tools used in financial regulation. I could go on but the bottom line is that there is something here for everyone – importantly pitched at the expert rather than the introductory level.

    Third, we are super keen to be informed by your views and frankly to be challenged by them. We are hugely grateful to our international speakers over the year for giving up their time so generously. My key message for you is that if you want to participate – particularly in our current priorities suite – please do let us know if you have an idea or an experience that you think our community should know about. Do not be shy on this front! This speaks to a wider aim we’ve got for CCBS to be a beacon for diversity and inclusion in all its forms.

    Huw will speak more about this. Before I hand over to him, if you are interested in getting up to speed on central banking and financial regulation in a structured and comprehensive way, the Bank of England and Warwick Business School’s online master’s qualification in global central banking and financial regulation is also open for business. Many of our own people go through this programme. All the details are available on our website.
    Huw welcome to the Bank and CCBS and over to you.

    Thanks John. My name is Huw Pill, and I have recently been appointed to the role of Chief Economist here at the Bank of England. One of the great pleasures of that role is working with John and his colleagues at the Centre for Central Banking Studies. For more than three decades the CCBS has been at the forefront of developing, sharing and spreading cutting-edge research and analysis of central bank issues. I have been fortunate enough both to have been a contributor to the courses and activities of CCBS but also from the other side been a participant in some of those activities and workshops and both sides that has been a tremendous motivation and reward for me. I’ve learnt a lot and have been able to build up relationships with lots of people in the central banking world. 

    The span of the centre’s activities continues to start from traditional areas in monetary policy and financial stability but has been extended broadly into regulatory and supervisory questions and now into the many new challenges that central banks are facing. We have got a lot of issues around technology and we have done work on central bank digital currencies, climate is of course becoming a more and more important question as I think John’s comments revealed and we are going to do more and more work on diversity and inclusion. 

    We hope that the CCBS can be a locus of that activity not only because we have important things to develop and learn from others in that space but also because pushing the boundaries of thinking about central banking requires the diversity of experience and the inclusivity of learning from others that those type of issues bring to bear. And that is reflective of the fact that the last decade or so has presented many challenges to the central banking community, the global financial crisis of course but more recently the response to the Covid pandemic. 

    Meeting those challenges has required leadership and in particular, intellectual leadership, and that is where CCBS has, is and will continue to be at the cutting edge and play a leading role. In doing that we certainly have lots to offer but we also have a lot to learn. I think we can especially learn from the experiences of other central banks. The experiences of you in essence. We are very much looking forward to welcoming you here in the coming year. So I hope with that in mind that in the course of the next few months I will see you either virtually or hopefully as the months precede even in person at the CCBS. I can certainly recommend the activities to you and I look forward to welcoming you in 2022.

CCBS in 2021 and beyond

High-level mission and strategy

Our Centre was established in 1990, and is one of the oldest providers of international central banking technical co-operation and assistance.

Our mission is to equip central bankers and financial regulators – both in the UK and across the globe – with the frontier skills and expert knowledge they need to tackle the challenges they face.

We do this to promote global and UK economic stability, as well as to support wider international development objectives. Our ambition to be at the frontier of global central banking also directly supports the Bank of England’s international mission.

Working with our colleagues across the Bank of England, we achieve this through:

  1. Our programme of international seminars and conferences for central bankers and regulators from all over the world. These cover a blend of:
    • novel and emerging areas which are high on the international central banking policy, operational and research agendas;
    • the best in class toolkits, techniques and approaches used in modern central banking; and
    • thematic and traditional areas of central banking – where we believe we can help build skills through the sharing of our experience.
  2. Our programme of technical co-operation and training with specific central banks in emerging Africa, Asia and the Middle East. This programme has been developed through our partnership with the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office.
  3. Conducting our own analytical work and research to push the knowledge frontier and showcasing that internationally.
  4. We also support the Bank’s wider internal and external skill-building activities, most notably, the post-graduate qualifications in global central banking and financial regulation developed with Warwick Business School.

Our approach to international seminars and workshops

Our international seminars and workshops are for central bankers and financial regulators only and geared towards experienced professionals. This focus allows us to promote open and frank debate among our community. Most are open to central bankers and regulators from all over the world. Some, however, are by invitation only.

They tend to be pitched at the cutting-edge of central banking and financial regulation. And in all our work we endeavour to promote best practice.

They are practitioner focused, drawing on our own experience, those from other countries as well as in some cases experts from academia and other organisations. Our format is usually a mixture of lectures, discussions, case studies and exercises.

We promote diversity in all its forms. We offer an inclusive environment and actively encourage the sharing of experience. We are keen to learn from the rest of the world and challenge our own thinking, particularly in our policy seminars.

Moreover we strongly encourage diverse participation in terms of race; gender; sexual orientation; disability; religion as well as local minorities in your home countries. We politely ask decision-makers to bear this in mind when nominating candidates.

All our international seminars and workshops are free of charge.

And in 2022 specifically…

Over the past 18 months we have experimented with online delivery and pivoted all of our programme to the virtual environment. We anticipate that online delivery will continue for the foreseeable future in 2022. And once the Covid pandemic subsides we expect to maintain a heavy online presence. This reflects our ability to reach more colleagues overseas, as well as climate change considerations. We will, however, flip some of our seminars and workshops towards physical or hybrid delivery as circumstances allow and if we judge that the event would benefit from physical presence.

For virtual seminars and workshops we will continue to accommodate requests to allow multiple participants from any individual institution.

We also aim to make source material/other resources available to participants and the rest of the central banking community to enhance access and inclusion.

Your views

We wish to understand better those areas where you would like to hear from the Bank of England. This will help inform the content of our current programme as well as help develop our future work. We are also keen to hear your views on whether our programmes should be run physically or virtually. Please complete our survey to have your say.

Virtual seminars in 2021 by date

Date

Subject

9–11 November 2021

Non-econometric tools for economists

16–18 November 2021

Operational resilience of the financial sector

24 November 2021

Climate change and central banking: a strategic perspective*

29 November – 1 December 2021

Key issues in the international monetary and financial system*

7–9 December 2021

Central banking risk management

Footnotes

  • *Invitation-only events.

Virtual seminars in 2022 by date

Date

Subject

8–9 February 2022

Workshop for Heads of supervisory credit risk*

24–25 February 2022

First annual BEAR Conference: the monetary toolkit

8–10 March 2022

Microprudential framework

15–17 March 2022

Applied Bayesian econometrics

6 April 2022

Building a fintech hub: organisation, objectives and strategy

9–10 May 2022

Chief Economists’ workshop*

17–19 May 2022

R for econometrics

26–27 May 2022

7th Macro-finance Workshop

8–9 June 2022

The fintech revolution: innovation in payments systems and technology

14–16 June 2022

3rd Workshop on household finance and housing

21–23 June 2022

Workshop for Heads of prudential policy*

5–6 July 2022

Workshop for Heads of banking supervision*

13 July 2022

Central bank balance sheets: taking the longer-term view

26–27 July 2022

Workshop for Heads of insurance supervision*

1 September 2022

International – the role of central banks in negotiating trade agreements

8 September 2022

The fintech revolution: artificial intelligence in financial services

19–23 September 2022

Economic modelling and forecasting

27–29 September 2022

Building diverse and inclusive central banks and financial regulators

4–6 October 2022

Macroprudential framework

11–12 October 2022

Advanced analytical tools for financial supervision and risk management

13–14 October 2022

Accelerating responsible innovation through Regulatory Technology (RegTech)

18–20 October 2022

Climate workshop – central bank operations and the transition to net zero

1–4 November 2022

Causal inference using microdata

9–10 November 2022

Non-bank financial intermediation

15–17 November 2022

Operational resilience of the financial sector

22–25 November 2022

R for non-econometrics

28–30 November 2022

International monetary and financial system workshop*

TBC

Risk Management in central banks

TBC

Advanced analytics: new methods and application for macreconomic policy

Footnotes

  • *Invitation-only events.

Virtual seminars

Cutting-edge analytics and toolkits


Applied Bayesian econometrics

15–17 March 2022

Event Directors:
Andrew Blake and Gabor Pinter

This event is an introduction to some of the techniques in Bayesian econometrics which can be useful for modelling and forecasting in central banks. It will provide an overview of the theory and then focus on practical implementation through computer/MATLAB based exercises. Topics include Gibbs sampling, Metropolis Hastings and Bayesian estimation of VAR and DSGE models.

Target group:
This seminar is aimed at economists working in the monetary policy, financial stability and research departments of central banks and regulatory authorities. They should have experience of classical econometrics (e.g. OLS, MLE) and knowledge of MATLAB programming is essential for this course.

R for econometrics

17–19 May 2022

Event Director:
Andrew Blake

Open-source software continues to grow both in importance and capability. For statisticians, open-source typically means R. For the central bank econometrician, R is an increasingly attractive platform to use. Almost all standard methods and many advanced ones are available in R as leading practitioners create libraries and packages. It can now feasibly replace dedicated packages as a primary econometric tool, with access to an impressive array of contemporary methods.

This event will show the power of R to do econometric analysis, leveraging the tools of the tidyverse to manipulate and visualise data effectively before using the programming language itself together with powerful R packages to create models for both time series and cross sectional data. This includes building and testing classical regression models, covering topics such as clustering standard errors for cross sectional inference, stationarity testing for time series and applications of quantile regression. Bayesian estimation is approached through both Gibbs Sampling and the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, with examples using transparent code as well as exploring dedicated packages.

Target group:
Applied economists in any area of a central bank/regulatory authority that use econometric methods to routinely analyse data, and who want to investigate how R can help them in this task from data manipulation, through analysis to report writing in an integrated environment.

Economic modelling and forecasting

19–23 September 2022

Event Directors:
Gabor Pinter and Andrew Blake

Accurate forecasts are only possible with a clear understanding of the structure of the economy and the shocks affecting it. This seminar aims to improve participants’ understanding of current modelling strategies and forecasting techniques. Topics include state space models, Kalman filter, DSGE and VAR models, Heterogeneous Agent New Keynesian (HANK) models panel data techniques – they will be accompanied by ample computer-based exercises.

Target group:
The event is aimed at economists working in quantitatively orientated departments of their central bank. They should have some experience of econometrics and a background in economics. Knowledge of MATLAB and Stata is essential.

Advanced analytical tools for financial supervision and risk management

11–12 October 2022

Event Directors:
David Barr and Angus Foulis

Financial supervision, and risk management more generally, make extensive use of tools derived from mathematics, statistics and probably theory. This event introduces the core toolkit (including, among other topics, Value at Risk, Extreme Value Theory, and copulas) along with cutting-edge techniques based on recent research. Our aim is to allow participants to understand and discuss key concepts and their applications without having to delve into the advanced mathematics required of risk management professionals.

Target group:
This event is aimed at economists, financial analysts and others with a mathematical background who wish to improve their understanding of existing risk management techniques, and who may be involved in analysing and attempting to improve regulatory regimes at a policy level.

Causal inference using microdata

1–4 November 2022

Event Directors:
Angus Foulis and Jagdish Tripathy

Quantification of causal mechanisms is the ultimate goal of empirical economics. However, in most cases this is challenging, as the underlying data are not generated randomly. A number of econometric techniques have been developed to overcome these challenges. The recent explosion of microdata has allowed these techniques to be applied to a wider range of questions. This course builds these frontier skills and applies them to a range of economic questions of interest for central bankers, using the microdata that are increasingly available to our community.

Target group:
The course is targeted at central bank economists working in quantitative areas. They should have experience with econometrics and an economics background. Some experience with Stata and microdata is preferred.

R for non-econometrics

22–25 November 2022

Event Directors:
Andrew Blake, Gabor Pinter and Jagdish Tripathy

As data sets available to economists evolve, so too must the methods that form the toolkit of analysis. Data sets with millions of observations or unstructured text documents need a different approach. At the same time, excellent texts such as James et al.’s ‘An introduction to statistical learning’, McElreath’s ‘Statistical Rethinking’ and Silge and Robinson’s ‘Text Mining with R’ show how to deal with many of the problems that new data sources pose. These offer exciting – and surprisingly tractable – alternatives to traditional econometrics methods.

A number of self-contained topics are likely to be covered, all in R and within a common framework. Topics such as regularised regression, regression trees, multilevel modelling and sentiment modelling are all likely to form part of the course as well as others. Topical, cutting-edge examples from our Advanced Analytics Division will provide a number of example uses of this increasingly important toolkit.

Target group:
Classically trained central bank econometricians who want an introduction to the insights that other, primarily statistical, literatures can bring.

Current priorities and topical issues in central banking and financial regulation


Microprudential framework

8–10 March 2022

Event Director:
Michael Smart

The prudential regulation and supervision of financial services firms continually adapts to the external environment. The post-crisis regulatory regime aims to ensure the safety and soundness of firms, with an increasing focus on financial stability as well as financial and operational resilience. The approach to prudential supervision has shifted to forward-looking, risk-based supervisory decisions and the use of supervisory judgement. This seminar will cover new and developing approaches to supervision and tools used by supervisors to support the assessment, measurement and mitigation of risk.

Target group:
This seminar is aimed at experienced prudential supervisors or central bankers who are interested in or have contributed to the development of forward-looking risk-based supervision. We welcome offers from participants to share their experiences.

Building a fintech hub: organisation, objectives and strategy

6 April 2022

Event Directors:
Alex Mitchell and Matthew Pegg

Fintech presents both opportunities and challenges to the financial system and to central banks and regulators. We have seen the potential of emerging technology to make the financial system more efficient, resilient and inclusive by facilitating economic growth and democratising financial services, however it brings with it a unique set of challenges. Central banks and financial regulators have organised themselves to ensure they are ready for this technology revolution and contribute as active participants. Objectives for fintech functions include:

  • supporting the safe adoption of new technology in finance;
  • influencing the interaction between the digital economy and finance;
  • driving policy on technology and innovation; and
  • supporting understanding of fintech.

Target group:
This seminar is aimed at central bankers and financial regulators with a leadership role in fintech or an expert practitioner in this field and wish to increase/share their understanding of the organisations of fintech functions in central banks and financial regulators, their objectives and strategy. The event will likely require participation from delegates. We welcome offers from colleagues to present on your organisation’s fintech organisation, objectives and strategy.

The fintech revolution: innovation in payments systems and technology

8–9 June 2022

Event Directors:
Matthew Pegg and David Barr

Innovation in payments offers significant benefits to users. Technological developments and regulatory initiatives have opened up the sector to competition, with new institutions and new business models emerging and changing the shape and length of traditional payment chains. Regulators globally have signalled their commitment to a road-map for enhancing cross-border payments. Central banks are refreshing their own infrastructure and, while doing so, making the most of the opportunity to increase resilience, interoperability and access. Finally, many authorities are considering the pros and cons of central bank digital currencies, as a form of trusted money in an increasingly digital world.

Target group:
Participants should have some expertise in payment systems with a particular focus on innovation in payments as it relates to central banking and regulation. The event will likely require participation from delegates. We welcome offers from colleagues to present on payments innovation in your organisation.

Central bank balance sheets: taking the longer-term view

13 July 2022

Event Directors:
Rhys Phillips, Andrea Rosen and Michael Smart

Since the Global Financial Crisis, and more recently during the Covid shock, central banks around the world have expanded their balance sheets and made much greater use of balance sheet tools as part of monetary policy. Many central banks are now thinking about the longer-term shape of their balance sheets, facing questions including the optimal size and composition; how balance sheet tools sit alongside interest rates in the monetary toolkit; and the governance around use of balance sheets in pursuit of objectives. The Bank will share its experiences so far, and seek to learn from others who are also tackling these questions.

Target group:
Participants should have some expertise in monetary policy and its implementation. We strongly encourage offers from participants to share their perspective and experiences.

International – the role of central banks in negotiating trade agreements

1 September 2022

Event Directors:
Serena Kern-Libera, Kayleigh Guinan and Michael Smart

In co-operation with the Bank of England’s International Directorate, this short webinar aims to identify how central banks could engage in the development of international trade agreements. The focus will be on establishing good practice in this novel area for central banks. We are keen to share our own experiences and ideas with participants, and to learn from others.

Target group:
This seminar is aimed at central bankers and financial regulators who are interested in or have contributed to the development of trade agreements. We welcome offers from participants to share their experiences.

The fintech revolution: artificial intelligence in financial services

8 September 2022

Event Directors:
Mohammed Gharbawi, Oliver Thew, Seema Visavadia and Matthew Pegg

There are benefits in an increasingly data‐driven economy for customers, firms, the wider financial system and economy. However, artificial intelligence and machine learning can pose novel challenges and amplify risks. Although the risks to consumers and firms are well understood, the systemic risks are less well understood. Artificial intelligence may have implications for the regulatory framework and there are areas where further guidance could help firms realise the benefits and mitigate the risks. Central banks and financial regulators can support the safe adoption of artificial intelligence in financial services.

Target group:
Participants should have some expertise in artificial intelligence and its application with a particular focus on artificial intelligence as it relates to central banking and regulation. The event will likely require participation from delegates. We welcome offers from colleagues to present on your organisation’s approach to artificial intelligence.

Building diverse and inclusive central banks and financial regulators

27–29 September 2022

Event Directors:
Matthew Pegg and TBC

Building a diverse and inclusive Bank of England is one of our strategic priorities, reflecting the importance we place on it. The current global context presents both challenges and opportunities, and the Bank of England needs to be human, humble and in step with the changing world to respond effectively. We need leaders who embody this ambition, and a truly inclusive culture to enable all colleagues to unlock their potential. We do this because it is the right thing to do and will make us even more effective as an organisation, now and for the future.

This seminar will cover topics including developing an inclusive culture, adapting culture and behaviours to support new ways of working, leadership and developing a more diverse workforce.

The event will likely require participation from delegates. We welcome offers from colleagues to present on topics relevant to diversity and inclusion in their organisation.

Target group:
This seminar is aimed at central bankers and financial regulators who have management or leadership positions in areas of their institution responsible for diversity and inclusion initiatives.

Macroprudential framework

4–6 October 2022

Event Director:
Christine Jayaseelan

Over the past decade, macroprudential policy has evolved as an important policy function for central banks around the world. It has evolved further in response to Covid. In this event we will discuss the shared challenges and lessons learnt in the assessment of systemic risk and the implementation of macroprudential policy. The event will be a practitioners’ focused and will likely cover: (1) the macroprudential policy framework; (2) the policy toolkit; (3) specialist’ frontier topics in macroprudential policy and financial stability; and (4) the suite of approaches and techniques in measuring systemic risk and resilience. Presentations will be given by experts from the Bank of England. We welcome offers to present on any of the topics above.

Target group:
This event is aimed at expert practitioners in the area of financial stability, macroprudential policy and systemic risk assessment in their home authorities. Participants should be able to speak to the arrangements in place in their jurisdictions, so that they can fully engage in the seminars. We recognise however that in many countries the macroprudential function is still in its infancy.

Accelerating responsible innovation through Regulatory Technology (RegTech)

13–14 October 2022

Event Directors:
Melvin Quimis and Matthew Pegg

The Bank of England has continued to accelerate responsible innovation, by continuing to explore and invest in Regulatory Technology (RegTech). In 2022, our RegTech agenda will focus on automation, strategy, research, digital skills and evolution.

The seminar will focus on the work of the Prudential Regulation Authority to develop and implement RegTech solutions for supervisory activities. Topics will include our digital skills journey, supervisory process improvements and our work with Artificial Intelligence (AI).

Target group:
This seminar is aimed at central bankers and financial regulators with some expertise in, or responsibility for RegTech solutions in their organisation. The event will likely require participation from delegates. We welcome offers from colleagues to present on topics relevant to the development and implementation of RegTech.

Climate workshop – central bank operations and the transition to net zero

18–20 October 2022

Event Directors:
Thomas Viegas and Michael Smart

The physical effects of climate change and the transition to a net-zero economy create financial risks and economic consequences. These risks and consequences matter for central banks and financial supervisors’ missions to maintain monetary and financial stability.

Central banks and supervisors can build resilience to the risks from climate change and support the net zero transition by ensuring that climate-related financial risks are pro-actively managed and pre-emptively mitigated through their policy functions (e.g. supervision of banks and insurers) and management of their own operations (e.g. the carbon footprint of buildings and corporate bond holdings).

This workshop will focus on how we might think about central banks’ own operations in the measurement, management and mitigation of the financial risks associated with climate change and transition to net zero. This includes assessing emissions from both their own physical activities (e.g. buildings, production of banknotes, and travel) and the potential link between the Bank’s financial market operations and emissions.

Target group:
The workshop is aimed at central bankers and regulators who are involved in monitoring, assessing, identifying, managing or mitigating risks related to climate change. We particularly encourage central bankers and regulators from emerging and developing markets to join us.

Presentations will be given by experts from central banks and supervisors. We strongly encourage offers from participants with an active interest in climate risk analysis to share their perspective and experiences.

Non-bank financial intermediation

9–10 November 2022

Event Directors:
David Barr and Angus Foulis

A significant proportion of the economy’s total credit intermediation now takes place outside the traditional banking system in what has been called, informally, the ‘shadow banking system’. The rise of non-bank financial intermediation of credit has had profound implications for the structure of the traditional banking system and for the wider economy. In this seminar we will aim to analyse how the new system operates, explore its impact on the financial system more generally and consider its implications for financial regulation.

Target group:
This seminar is aimed primarily at central bankers and regulators who wish to improve their understanding of how the shadow banking system works and its implications for financial stability and monetary policy.

Operational resilience of the financial sector

15–17 November 2022

Event Directors:
Nick Strange, Karen Gutierrez, Amy Lee and Matthew Pegg

Operational disruption can affect financial stability, threaten the viability of individuals firms and Financial Market Infrastructures, or cause harm to consumers and other market participants in the financial system. The challenges of making the financial sector resilient to this disruption have become more complex and intense in recent years, during a period of technological change and in an increasingly hostile cyber environment.

The workshop will explore the macroprudential and microprudential challenges of operational resilience and cyber; firms and policymakers must now move beyond preventing operational incidents towards actively responding, recovering and learning from them.

Target group:
The event is aimed at central bankers and regulators with an interest in or responsibility for monitoring, assessing, identifying or mitigating risks related to operational disruption. This responsibility may relate to the supervision of specific firms/financial market infrastructures; the financial stability of the sector as a whole; or the development of relevant policy. Attendees will be interested in learning about operational resilience, including key elements and perspectives for supervision and policy. We welcome offers from participants to share their experiences.

Research and analytics focused conferences


First Annual BEAR Conference: the monetary toolkit

24–25 February 2022

We expect that this conference will be a hybrid event held onsite at the Bank of England and virtually using Microsoft Teams.

Event Directors:
Cristiano Cantore, Gabor Pinter and Andrew Blake

The aim of the conference is to promote BEAR with researchers in academia, other central banks and international institutions, and to foster discussion and collaboration with our researchers.

Further details including academic presenters and keynote speaker information, are separately available on a dedicated webpage.

7th Macro-finance Workshop

26–27 May 2022

Event Directors:
Gabor Pinter and Professor John Moore

The aim of this workshop, jointly organised with Professor John Moore, is to invite academics and central bankers from all around the world to present the frontiers of macro-finance related to the updated Bank of England Agenda for Research. Speakers in previous years included Ricardo Caballero, John Cochrane, Darrell Duffle, Nobuhiro Kiyotaki, Sydney Ludvigson, Anna Pavlova, Ricardo Reis, Helene Rey, Jean Tirole and Dimitri Vayanos among many others.

Target group:
Academics as well as research economists and senior policymakers working in central banks and regulatory authorities in the area of macro-finance are welcome to attend.

3rd Workshop on household finance and housing

14–16 June 2022

Event Directors:
Angus Foulis and Jagdish Tripathy

This workshop will bring together leading researchers to present frontier empirical and theoretical work related to the Bank of England Agenda for Research, in the broad fields of household finance and housing. It follows on from successful workshops held in 2020 and 2021 which were jointly organised with Imperial College Business School and the London School of Economics.

Target group:
Academics, central bank economists and financial regulators working on empirical and theoretical topics within the areas of household finance and housing are welcome to attend.

Advanced analytics: new methods and application for macreconomic policy

Dates TBC

Event Directors:
Andreas Joseph and Andrew Blake

Advanced analytics techniques, such as the analysis of novel large and unstructured data sources, or the application of techniques from machine learning and artificial intelligence, offer new insights into problems in economics and finance. These approaches have now found their way into broad-based research programmes in academia and policy institutions. This conference is the latest in a series of events jointly organised by the Bank of England, the European Central Bank and the Data Analytics for Finance and Macro Research Centre at King’s College London. The conference aims to connect leading researchers in academia and policy institutions to present and discuss the latest advances in the interdisciplinary field of advanced analytics in an economics, finance and policy context.

Target group:
Active researchers in central banks and academia who work in relevant areas who want to share policy-relevant research, and central bank staff and policymakers who wish to learn from it.

Application and practical information

Full details of our web-based electronic application process can be found in our How to apply documentation.

View forthcoming CCBS events

Apply to attend an event

If you need further information or assistance, please email the CCBS Administration Team at:

MS Teams and GoTo Webinar

Our virtual events are conducted via MS Teams or GoTo webinar. If your application is successful you will be sent information on which software will be used. A joining link will be sent for all MS Teams event and a registration link for any GoTo Webinar events. Further details of how to join the Webinar can be found in our Registering with GoTo Webinar and MS Teams documentation.

Administrative information

Successful applicants can download the event programme and list of participants from the CCBS website. You will be notified when the programme has been finalised.

Costs

The Bank of England makes no charge for tuition; our virtual seminars are free to attend.

Recordings

Participants will be notified if the Webinar they are attending is being recorded.

Presentations

Participants will be notified whether materials used in the Webinar presentations will be shared with them. If so, they will be sent this following the event.

Resources

CCBS produces various publications with the aim of presenting particular topics which concern central banks and regulatory authorities in a concise, balanced and accessible manner and in a practical context.

This page was last updated 05 November 2021

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